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Resources

The IGGA, Departments of Transportation, academia and other industry partners have developed numerous technical and educational resources detailing not only state-of-the-art but also tried-and-true methods of diamond saw-cut pavement surfacing and concrete pavement preservation. We have assembled this library of information for your use. The following search engine should be able to locate the information you are looking for.

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CPR: Rebuilt to Last: Interstate-44 in Oklahoma City, OK Utilizes Concrete Pavement Restoration

A physical survey conducted before work began on Interstate-44 in Oklahoma City, OK, revealed severe panel damage and faulted pavement. Due to the high level of traffic and poor road conditions, a fast-track yet long-term solution was needed. Dowel bar retrofit (DBR), diamond grinding, joint sealing, selective panel replacement and base repair were used on the project for all lanes in both directions. The result for taxpayers is a smooth road that is expected to last 15 years.

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Highway

Diamond Grinding, Dowel Bar Retrofit

Smoothness

CPR: Rebuilt to Last: Building Safe, Quiet Roads in Duluth, MN

In September 2010, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) and Concrete Paving Association of Minnesota (CPAM), and the International Grooving and Grinding Association (IGGA) hosted a live demonstration of Next Generation Concrete Surface (NGCS) construction on the I-35 project site in Duluth.NGCS was chosen to create a grinding pattern that was quieter.

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Highway

Next Generation Concrete Surface (NGCS)

Tire/Pavement Noise

CPR: Rebuilt to Last: Interstate 94, Minnesota

In 2009, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) began concrete rehabilitation on the original 65-mile stretch of Interstate 94 between Minneapolis and St. Cloud. Many concrete pavement preservation treatmens were used in the initial repair effort, which took place across approximately 40 miles, including full depth repair and partial depth repair with diamond grinding. The final phase of repair used the method known as "Buried Treasure" - a method referred to as such because non-destructive testing tools allow for the collection of information.

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Highway

Concrete Pavement Preservation and Restoration, Diamond Grinding, Full & Partial Depth Repair

Sustainability/Environmental

CPR: Rebuilt to Last: Bonville Upgrade, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales (NSW) Australia

The Pacific Highway Bonville Upgrade section of the Pacific Highway in New South Wales, Australia, is a small plain concrete pavement (PCP) link between Sydney and Brisbane. The project involved diamond grinding various areas on both the northbound and southbound lanes.The disposal of slurry into existing settlement ponds with a low pH level provided an added benefit, making the waste water more suitable to treatment through a newly commissioned plant. The overall success of this project resulted in the reduced roughness count.

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Highway

Diamond Grinding

Smoothness

CPR: Rebuilt to Last: Pavement Management Systems (PMS) improve pavement conditions and reduce costs in Kentucky

While Concrete Pavement Preservation (CPP) techniques include slab stabilization, full depth repair, partial depth repair, dowel bar retrofit, cross stitching longitudinal cracks/joints, dimond grinding, joint resealing and crack resealing, the most common CPP technique used in Kentucky is diamond grinding. Kentucky demonstrated five years of improved IRI through diamond grinding and saved over $1 billion using pavement management systems (PMS).

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Highway

Diamond Grinding

CPR: Rebuilt to Last: Infrastructure improvements in Jonesboro, AR

The surface of the Route 63 highway had become rough after carrying 40-plus years of significant passenger and commercial traffic. The Arkansas Highway Transportation Department (AHTD) opted to use patching and diamond grinding as well as joint sawing and joint resealing. The roadway now boasts a safer riding surface with a nearly 56% improvement in smoothness.

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Highway

Concrete Pavement Preservation and Restoration, Diamond Grinding, Full & Partial Depth Repair, Joint and Crack Resealing

Structural/Material Issues

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